Published: Friday, September 16, 2022, Updated: Friday, September 16, 2022

Differentiation of Operators in C Programming Language with Examples

Differentiation of Operators in C Programming Language with Examples

Differentiation of operators are used in C Programming Language are given below with Examples.

Differences between & and && operators

&& is a logical AND operator. The output of this operation is either 1 or 0. 1 represents the condition is TRUE and 0 represents the condition is FALSE

Example: 
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  int a=10, b=11,c;
  c= a && b;
  printf("%d",c);
  return 0;
}
Output: 1

& is a bitwise AND operator. The output of this operation is the combine value after performing bitwise operation.

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  int a=10, b=11,c;
  c= a & b;
  printf("%d",c);
  return 0;
}
Output:  10

Differences between | and || operators

|| is a logical OR operator. The output of this operation is either 1 or 0. 1 represents the condition is TRUE and 0 represents the condition is FALSE

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  int a=10, b=11,c;
  c= a || b;
  printf("%d",c);
  return 0;
}
Output:  1

| is a bitwise OR operator. The output of this operation is the combine value after performing bitwise OR operation.

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  int a=10, b=11,c;
  c= a | b;
  printf("%d",c);
  return 0;
}
Output: 11

Differences between = and == operators

== is a logical EQUAL TO operator. The output of this operation is either 1 or 0. 1 represents the condition is TRUE and 0 represents the condition is FALSE

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  int a=10, b=11,c;
  c= a == b;
  printf("%d",c);
  return 0;
}

Output: 0

= is an assignment operator. It assigns the value to its variable.

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  int a=10, b=11,c;
  c= a = b;
  printf("%d",c);
  return 0;
}
Output: 11

Differences between < and << operators

< is a logical LESS THAN operator. The output of this operation is either 1 or 0. 1 represents the condition is TRUE and 0 represents the condition is FALSE

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a = 5, b = 4;
    printf("%d\n", a<b);
    return 0;
}
Output: 0

<< is a LEFT-SHIFT bitwise operator. It performs operation based on Binary number system. This operator shifts binary 0 to left. The number of shifted 0 depends on the value of operands in the right position of this operator. 

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a = 5;//BINARY 101
    printf("%d\n", a<<1);//BINARY RESULT 1010
    return 0;
}
Output: 10

Differences between > and >> operators

> is a logical GREATER THAN operator. The output of this operation is either 1 or 0. 1 represents the condition is TRUE and 0 represents the condition is FALSE

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a = 5, b = 4;
    printf("%d\n", a>b);
    return 0;
}
Output: 1

>> is a RIGHT-SHIFT bitwise operator. It performs operation based on Binary number system. This operator shifts out binary 0 from the right. The number of shifted digits depends on the value of operands in the right position of this operator. 

Example:
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a = 5;//BINARY 101
    printf("%d\n", a>>1);//BINARY RESULT 10
    return 0;
}
Output: 2